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Day and Date Release #3: Field Notes   27.10.2019

Silver, laserprint, wood frame, 30 x 25 cm

 
Day and Date Release is a series of works that that were specially made for a specific date. These works reflect on the speculativeness of a historical event that managed to nestle in the collective memory.
On October 27, 1873, American Joseph F. Glidden applied for a patent for his invention barbed wire. This meant a breakthrough to stop or isolate cattle and later also people. Previously, mainly thorny bushes or trees were used to hold the cattle together. Presented as a herbarium, Collier unites in Field Notes four designs for handmade barbed wire, which were called The Big Four, with plants from the area where these designs come from.
Day and Date Release #2: illusions & delusions   16.05.2019

Embroidered napkin, 43 x 43 cm

Edition of 90

 
 
Day and Date Release is a series of works that that were specially made for a specific date. These works reflect on the speculativeness of a historical event that managed to nestle in the collective memory.
illusions & delusions refers to the first Oscar ceremony that took place on the 16th of May 1929. According to the Hollywood legend, MGM art director Cedric Gibbons drew the design for the Oscar statue on a napkin that afterwards was given to sculptor George Stanley, who sculpted the trophy into clay. However, the original drawing has been lost and has never been documented. As an interpretation of this event, Collier recreates a fake copy of the iconic Oscar design. The embroidered drawing contrasts with the ephemeral memory of this event.
Day and Date Release #1: Method Acting  7.09.2017

Leather glove, electroplated tin

Edition of 3 + 1 AP

Day and Date Release is a series of works that that were specially made for a specific date. These works reflect on the speculativeness of a historical event that managed to nestle in the collective memory.
With Method Acting Collier reflects upon the disjointed relationship between language and behavior as a means to question the nature of the real. The electroplated glove on the exhibition floor refers to a scene of Elia Kazan’s film On The Waterfront (1954). Here the object, by chance, challenges the actors to switch between his fictional and his own persona. The glove bears no resemblance at all to the one in the film; it simply represents an image of an image